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Скачать книгу Nobody’s Son: Part 3 of 3: All Alex ever wanted was a family of his own

Nobody’s Son: Part 3 of 3: All Alex ever wanted was a family of his own

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Язык: Английский
Год издания: 2018 год
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      Nobody’s Son: Part 3 of 3: All Alex ever wanted was a family of his own
Cathy Glass

Born in a prison and removed from his drug-dependent mother, rejection is all that 7-year-old Alex knows.When Cathy is asked to foster little Alex, aged 7, her immediate reaction is: Why can’t he stay with his present carers for the last month? He’s already had many moves since coming into care as a toddler and he’ll only be with her a short while before he goes to live with his permanent adoptive family. But the present carers are expecting a baby and the foster mother isn’t coping, so Alex goes to live with Cathy.He settles easily and is very much looking forward to having a forever family of his own. The introductions and move to his adoptive family go well. But Alex is only with them for a week when problems begin. What happens next is both shocking and upsetting, and calls into question the whole adoption process.

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Copyright (#u8d1dfffa-4FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Certain details in this story, including names, places and dates, have been changed to protect the family’s privacy.

HarperElement

An imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers

1 London Bridge Street

London SE1 9GF

www.harpercollins.co.uk (http://www.harpercollins.co.uk)

First published by HarperElement 2017

FIRST EDITION

© Cathy Glass 2017

Cover layout design © HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd 2017

Cover photograph © Deborah Pendell/Arcangel Images (boy, posed by model); Shutterstock.com (background)

A catalogue record of this book is available from the British Library

Cathy Glass asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work

All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the nonexclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this e-book on screen. No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, downloaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage retrieval system, in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of HarperCollins e-books.

Find out about HarperCollins and the environment at

www.harpercollins.co.uk/green (http://www.harpercollins.co.uk/green)

Source ISBN: 9780008187569

Ebook Edition © February 2017 ISBN: 9780008187613

Version: 2017-01-09

Contents

Cover (#u8d1dfffa-1FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Title Page (#u8d1dfffa-2FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Copyright (#u8d1dfffa-3FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Chapter Sixteen: Say Something Positive (#u8d1dfffa-5FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Chapter Seventeen: Not to Blame (#u8d1dfffa-6FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

Chapter Eighteen: Labelled (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Nineteen: Conflicting Emotions (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Twenty: Not Mum and Dad (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Twenty-One: The Family (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Twenty-Two: The Line Went Dead (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Twenty-Three: Before It’s Too Late (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Twenty-Four: The Hug (#litres_trial_promo)

Suggested topics for reading-group discussion (#litres_trial_promo)

Cathy Glass (#litres_trial_promo)

If you loved this book … (#litres_trial_promo)

Moving Memoirs eNewsletter (#litres_trial_promo)

About the Publisher (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter Sixteen

Say Something Positive (#u8d1dfffa-4FFF-11e9-9e03-0cc47a520474)

‘What’s that?’ Adrian cried in alarm from the living room.

‘It’s Alex. I’m going to him now.’

I hurried up the stairs to his bedroom as one crash followed another. After giving a perfunctory knock on his door I went in. A toy car zoomed past my head and crashed into the wall behind me.

‘Alex! Put that down,’ I said as he picked up another toy ready to throw. ‘You’ll break it.’

‘Don’t care!’

He threw it. The floor was already littered with items he’d thrown in the short time it had taken me to leave the kitchen and come upstairs: toys, books, his new trainers: in fact, anything that had come to hand.

‘That’s enough!’ I said as he raised his hand again. A box of crayons flew across the room. I went over and, taking him by the arm, drew him away from the toy box.

‘Leave me alone!’ he cried, struggling.

‘No. You’re going to regret breaking your toys. I know you’re angry and upset, but this isn’t the way to show it.’

‘Yes, it is!’ He pulled against me, trying to reach a book, possibly to hit me with.

‘No, Alex. Come and sit down and calm down.’

‘I hate you!’ he cried. He was easily held, he was so small and light.

‘Alex, if you’re angry punch the pillow,’ I said, directing him to the pillow on his bed. ‘It’s better than breaking your toys or hitting me.’ I thumped the pillow hard with my fist to demonstrate. ‘You can hit the pillow as hard as you like.’ I’d encouraged other children I’d fostered to pillow or cushion thump when they needed to let go of their anger. It was one of the techniques I used. ‘Go on. Thump it hard, like I am,’ I said, pummelling the pillow. He followed my example and thumped the pillow a few times, then turned his anger on his soft toys and thumped them too. He immediately regretted it and burst into tears.

‘I’m sorry,’ he said, picking up Simba and hugging him. ‘I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to hurt you.’

I eased him down to sit on the bed and I sat next to him. ‘Simba will be OK,’ I said gently. ‘Lions are very strong.’

Alex buried his face in his soft toy and cried quietly, his anger spent for now. I slipped my arm around his waist. ‘It’s OK,’ I said. ‘You’ll be all right soon.’

Footsteps sounded on the stairs and then Paula appeared at Alex’s bedroom door, looking very worried. I threw her a reassuring smile. ‘You go down with Adrian. Alex and I will be down soon.’ She gave a small nod, turned and went downstairs.
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