А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я Ё
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Выберите необходимое действие:
Меню
Свернуть
Скачать книгу Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire

Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire

Автор:
Язык: Английский
Год издания: 2018 год
<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 >>

Читать онлайн «Empire of Secrets: British Intelligence, the Cold War and the Twilight of Empire»

     
9 (#litres_trial_promo). Dudley Clarke. (Courtesy of Churchill Archives Centre)

10 (#litres_trial_promo). Lаszlо Almаsy. (akg-images/Ullstein Bild)

11 (#litres_trial_promo). Long Range Desert Group, North Africa. (Getty Images)

12 (#litres_trial_promo). Sir Percy Sillitoe. (Popperfoto/Getty Images)

13 (#litres_trial_promo). Police use tear gas during a riot in Calcutta, 1947. (Getty Images)

14 (#litres_trial_promo). The bombing of the King David Hotel, Jerusalem, 22 July 1946. (Getty Images)

15 (#litres_trial_promo). Menachem Begin wanted poster. (Getty Images)

16 (#litres_trial_promo). Sir John Shaw. (The Bodleian Libraries, the University of Oxford)

17 (#litres_trial_promo). MI5 report on Jewish terrorism in the Middle East. (The National Archives, ref. CO 733/457/14)

18 (#litres_trial_promo). British soldiers question a group of schoolboys in Jerusalem, 1947. (Getty Images)

19 (#litres_trial_promo). Major Roy Farran at his brother’s grave, 1948. (PA/PA Archive/Press Association Images)

20 (#litres_trial_promo). British paratrooper in the Malayan jungle, 1952. (Getty Images)

21 (#litres_trial_promo). Ghana’s independence ceremony, 1957. (Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

22 (#litres_trial_promo). Jomo Kenyatta. (Popperfoto/Getty Images)

23 (#litres_trial_promo). Suspected Mau Mau victim. (Getty Images)

24 (#litres_trial_promo). Mau Mau prisoners in Kenya. (Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

25 (#litres_trial_promo). The arrival of the Empire Windrush at Tilbury, 22 June 1948. (Topfoto)

26 (#litres_trial_promo). The Petrov affair, 1954. (National Archives of Australia)

27 (#litres_trial_promo). British paratroopers embarking for Suez, 1956. (Popperfoto/Getty Images)

28 (#litres_trial_promo). Cheddi Jagan with ousted ministers, British Guiana, 1953. (Bettmann/Corbis)

29 (#litres_trial_promo). Archbishop Makarios visiting a British Army camp in Cyprus, 1960. (Topfoto)

30 (#litres_trial_promo). British soldiers in Cyprus, c.1956. (Getty Images)

31 (#litres_trial_promo). British soldier threatening Arab demonstrators, Aden, 1967. (Getty Images)

32 (#litres_trial_promo). Chris Patten, Hong Kong, July 1997. (Eric Draper/AP/Press Association Images)

33 (#litres_trial_promo). The US base on Diego Garcia. (Corbis)

Abbreviations and Glossary (#ulink_05b5aabd-12b3-5d7f-b88f-d7ddfb86eeab)

Abwehr – German espionage service

ASIO Australian Security Intelligence Organisation – Australian domestic intelligence service

ASIS Australian Secret Intelligence Service – Australian foreign intelligence service

CIA Central Intelligence Agency – American foreign-intelligence-gathering agency

CID Criminal Investigation Department – Department of regular police force

CPGB Communist Party of Great Britain

DIB Delhi Intelligence Bureau – Pre-independence Indian intelligence agency

DSO Defence Security Officer – MI5 liaison officer in a colonial or Commonwealth country

FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation – US law-enforcement agency

GC&CS Government Code & Cypher School – Pre-war and wartime British SIGINT service

GCHQ Government Communications Headquarters – Renamed post-war British SIGINT service

HOW Home Office Warrant – MI5’s mechanism for mail and telephone interception

HUMINT Human intelligence

IB Intelligence Bureau – Indian intelligence service, another name for DIB

IPI Indian Political Intelligence – Pre-independence agency in London responsible for intelligence on Indian affairs

JIC Joint Intelligence Committee – ‘High table’ of British intelligence community

KGB Committee for State Security – Soviet foreign intelligence-gathering agency

LIC Local Intelligence Committee – Regional colonial intelligence set up in colonies on MI5’s advice in early Cold War

MI5 – British intelligence service responsible for counter-espionage, counter-subversion and counter-sabotage in British territory

MI6 – Secret intelligence service responsible for gathering HUMINT from non-British territories

NSA National Security Agency – US SIGINT agency

RCMP Royal Canadian Mounted Police – Canadian law-enforcement agency

SAS Special Air Service – British special forces

Security Service – MI5

SIFE Security Intelligence Far East – MI5 inter-service intelligence outfit in the Far East

SIGINT Signals intelligence

SIME Security Intelligence Middle East – MI5 inter-service intelligence outfit in the Middle East

SIS Secret Intelligence Service – British foreign-intelligence-gathering service

SLO Security Liaison Officer – MI5 liaison officer in a colonial or Commonwealth country

Introduction (#ulink_a9671fd7-f1dc-5b3e-9395-fbd4866799e6)

In times of travail, Britain’s tendency was to rely more, not less, on spies. Her entire empire history urged her to do so. The thinner her trade routes, the more elaborate her clandestine efforts to protect them. The more feeble her colonial grip, the more desperate her subversion of those who sought to loosen it.

JOHN LE CARRЕ, The Honourable Schoolboy

On a cold morning in April 1947, a female terrorist slipped into the main headquarters of the Colonial Office in London. After politely asking a security guard if she could shelter from the chill indoors, she placed an enormous bomb, consisting of twenty-four sticks of dynamite, wrapped in newspaper, in the downstairs toilet, then calmly walked back out into the busy street and disappeared into the crowd. Her identity was not known at the time to either the police or MI5, but she worked for a terrorist ‘cell’ in Britain belonging to the Stern Gang, one of the two main paramilitary organisations fighting the British in Palestine. The explosives used for the bomb had been given to her by another Stern Gang agent, a wounded Franco-Jewish war veteran, known as the ‘dynamite man’, who had avoided detection by smuggling the dynamite into Britain in his artificial leg. The aim of these agents, and of other Stern Gang cells operating in Britain, was to use violence to force the British government into establishing an independent Jewish state in Palestine.

Even before this incident, MI5 had already been placed on high alert for possible terrorist outrages to be conducted in Britain. In the light of increasingly alarming reports from its sources in the Middle East, warning that Jewish paramilitaries planned to extend their ‘war’ against the British from Palestine to Britain itself, MI5 mounted intensive surveillance operations on known radical Jewish and Zionist groups in Britain. MI5’s investigations revealed a number of terrorist cells operating in London, whose members were planning bombing campaigns and assassinations of leading British politicians. In 1946 the head of MI5 briefed the Prime Minister that he and cabinet ministers were targets. That same year, another terrorist cell launched a letter-bomb campaign directed at every member of the British cabinet. All of the bombs, found to be potentially lethal, were successfully intercepted.
<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 >>
Новинки
Свернуть
Популярные книги
Свернуть